March 1, 2010

Ocean acidity rates could lead to mass extinction

A study led by Dr. Andy Ridgwell of the United Kingdom’s University of Bristol examined ocean sediment to determine how levels of acid have changed throughout history. Its findings revealed that ocean acidity is increasing ten times faster today than 65 million years ago, when dinosaurs became extinct, due to currently rising levels of atmospheric CO2.

With excessive acidification causing the carbonate shells of certain marine organisms to dissolve along with muscle wasting and dwarfism in other species, Dr. Ridgwell said that the rate of today’s acidification is threatening the basis of all marine life.

Dr. Ridgwell and University of Bristol associates, our sincere thanks for bringing to light this important information that highlights our need to act now. May we humans deeply realize that our daily choices affect our future on the planet.

During a March 2009 videoconference in California, USA, Supreme Master Ching Hai once again emphasized the importance of protecting the oceans’ delicate balance, on which ultimately our own lives depend.

Supreme Master Ching Hai: There’s another condition called acidification where the lack of certain fish has contributed to higher ocean acidity which, in turn, reduces the capacity of the ocean to absorb CO2.

And the ocean is a very complex ecosystem where every living thing has a unique function. So, removing even a small fish for humans to eat creates an imbalance in the sea. In fact, we are already seeing an effect of this imbalance on marine mammals.

As the ocean becomes warmer and warmer and more acidic, more toxins are present in the water.

Anything God puts on Earth is for a purpose. We should not kill anything. We should not eat anything except plant-based diet.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/7223827/Pollution-creating-acid-oceans.html
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/nature/oceans-acidity-rate-is-soaring-claims-study-1899536.html
http://www.e360.yale.edu/content/feature.msp?id=2241

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