January 11, 2010

Echoes of storms may contribute to Antarctic ice shelf collapse

Besides global warming, a new study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters says that tsunami-like “infra-gravity waves” may be causing some of this past decade’s biggest ice collapses.

As most ice shelves are over 1,000 feet thick, they are generally not affected by ocean waves. However, infra-gravity waves occur when the energy of the waves from a storm is echoed back out to the ocean for thousands of miles.

Just before the Wilkins Shelf disintegrated in 2008, a large storm had pounded the coast of Patagonia, sending off an infra-gravity wave. Dr. Peter Bromirski of the US-based Scripps Institute of Oceanography stated, “Regular sea swells chip off little icebergs from the edges. Infra-gravity waves could be affecting a much greater part of the ice shelf.”

Dr. Bromirski and colleagues, we appreciate this new information about ice shelf disintegration. Let us hasten our steps toward lifestyles in harmony with nature to stabilize the climate and help preserve our Earth.

Ever-concerned for our planetary welfare, Supreme Master Ching Hai addressed such effects of an unbalanced ecosphere and the need for action during a January 2009 videoconference in Mongolia.

Supreme Master Ching Hai: We are already facing so many untold natural disasters on a daily basis such as earthquakes, severe storms never seen before, volcanoes, ice melting and many island nations that have sunk under the water already and many are sinking. And the climate has become very, very strange, like it became warm where it should be cold and it became cold where it should be hot. And this can only be alleviated through a return to the ancient ways of our wiser elders, one that exists in harmony with nature and respect of other beings, a true brotherhood of love with all.

We can still do that; it’s not too late.

We should remind everyone to be veg, to invoke the mercy of the Buddhas, and we will be better protected.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/34638036/ns/technology_and_science-science

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