December 28, 2009

Birdlife International highlights the avian impact of climate change

Evaluative surveys including data gathered by US citizens over the past 40 years have revealed that 58% of the 305 species wintering on the North American continent have shifted significantly north since 1968, some by hundreds of kilometers. A study in Europe has also concluded that without urgent action to halt climate change, European bird populations will decrease in size by one-fifth and move 550 kilometers northeast by the end of this century.

According to Birdlife data, even with the global temperature increase experienced thus far, over 400 bird species have been impacted. Our sincere appreciation, Birdlife International for your dedicated voice in support of our avian co-inhabitants.

Let us all step quickly to bring about change that will save treasured lives on Earth. During an April 2009 climate conference in South Korea, Supreme Master Ching Hai responded to a question on how being veg and going green could protect all wildlife, including the precious birds.

Supreme Master Ching Hai: In regard to the message, “I am a vegan and green, save the Earth,” this is surely connected to all the animals and the birds also. Once we understand one species of animals, we could understand other species as well. Being vegan simply means we don’t eat the animals, we don’t harm any animal.

This will save the planet and preserve the treasured wilds, such as the birds. We should all remember that we share this planetary abode, the water, the air, the resources, the food, all of nature, we share only.
We should not be possessive of nature. So, the best thing we can do for the birds and all the animals is to stop causing suffering to them, stop killing them, stop eating them, stop damaging all our habitats.
Stop damaging our environment. Be veg, go green and save their planet too, the planet of the animals.

http://www.birdlife.org/news/news/2009/12/climate_impacts.html
http://www.birdlife.org/contact.html
http://www.audubonportland.org/issues/climate_change
http://www.nhbs.com/european_bird_populations_tefno_105371.html

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