November 23, 2009

Nitrogen must be curbed for the health of the planet

A series of recent studies show that excessive levels of nitrogen are contaminating the Earth’s soil, waters and atmosphere, which in turn is endangering ecosystems.
Behind the dangerous increase in nitrogen levels are factors that include rising livestock populations, with farmed animals emitting 67% of the human-generated greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. This gas is nearly 300 times more heat trapping than carbon dioxide over a 20-year period. Another major source of nitrogen is chemical fertilizers, which also go to crops that feed livestock.

Scientists have recommended that the levels of human-caused nitrogen be reduced by 75%, which would require an overhaul of the world’s agriculture system. Our sincere thanks all scientists for raising awareness of the perilously high levels of nitrogen and their source.

Let us all heed the warning and contribute to our planet’s immediate health by choosing plant-based organic foods. Supreme Master Ching Hai has long highlighted the need to foster compassionate lifestyles to reverse such damaging consequences, as during a May 2009 climate change videoconference in Togo.

Supreme Master Ching Hai:The biggest thing is to forgo all animal products, whatsoever, and spread the message to as many people as possible that this is the solution So, the reason on the physical level is to stop methane and nitrous oxide, the two gases that are produced by livestock raising. the animals that are raised for meat are producing more greenhouse gases than all the worldwide transportation combined.

Supreme Master Ching Hai:If we eliminate meat from our diet, global warming is reduced very quickly by a tremendous amount, if not the most of it. If everyone becomes vegan, stops raising more animals for food and, instead, growing organic vegetables, our Earth and the environment can be saved, and as quick as we
could not even imagine – in a few weeks.


http://www.e360.yale.edu/content/feature.msp?id=2207
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-11/asu-ans110309.php

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