November 19, 2009

Impacts of climate change in Madagascar

With three consecutive years of unsuccessful crops, dwindling resources in southern Madagascar have resulted in food insecurity and malnutrition among children. Village chief Valiotaky stated, “When we plant trees, we don't have rain and nothing grows.” By contrast, the country’s northern regions have been inundated with cyclones three times a year.

United Nations World Food Program Deputy Country Director Silvia Caruso said, “Environmental degradation and climate change are building on each other. The results are dramatic in Madagascar.”

Mother in Madagascar (Malagasy Language):I had seeds and planted sweet potatoes. But because there was no rain, they dried up. I noticed my daughter was getting thinner but there was no food and when she got even thinner, I took her to the health center.

Our prayers go to the people of Madagascar for Heaven’s protection and the blessings of more comfortable living conditions. Let us quickly turn to compassionate lifestyles that honor and cherish all beings for the restoration of our shared planetary home. Ever concerned for humanity’s welfare, Supreme Master Ching Hai addressedthe perilous situation facing Africa during a May 2009 videoconference in Togo.

Supreme Master Ching Hai : There are water crises from Sierra Leone to South Africa. Zimbabwe, Somalia, Mauritius, Mozambique, and Sudan – just to name a few – are experiencing worsened droughts that make it difficult to plant crops, thus adding to food shortages and prices rising. Add to this, desertification and deforestation that further degrade the land. Increased temperatures mean erratic rainfall If you’re a farmer, you already can feel that the climate is in trouble.

There are more frequent droughts, heat waves, floods, storms, frosts, freezes, and locusts than before.
If the world becomes vegan as a group, we can remedy the disasters that affect us globally.

Supreme Master Ching Hai: This is something all citizens of the world can do. Be vegan. Be a world-saver.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/oct/23/madagascar-drought

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